An analysis of the capacity of every person in the world to be violent in the black cat by edgar all

Claiming himself to be an animal lover, his story is a confession of how he came to murder his wife because of a cat. He drinks alcohol heavily, but he blames the black cat for what has happened, rather than himself; he owns his own house and, as such, appears to be a fairly wealthy man.

An analysis of the capacity of every person in the world to be violent in the black cat by edgar all

The narrator of "The Black Cat" is fully aware of his mental deterioration, and at certain points in the story, he recognizes the change that is occurring within him, and he tries to do something about it, but he finds himself unable to reverse his falling into madness.

In Poe's critical essay, "The Philosophy of Composition," he wrote about the importance of creating a unity or totality of effect in his stories. By this, he meant that the artist should decide what effect he wants to create in a story and in the reader's emotional response and then proceed to use all of his creative powers to achieve that particular effect: In virtually all of Poe's tales, we know nothing about the narrator's background; this particular story is no exception.

Edgar Allan Poe

In addition, it is akin to "The Tell-Tale Heart" in that the narrator begins his story by asserting that he is not mad "Yet, mad am I not — " and, at the same time, he wants to place before the world a logical outline of the events that "have terrified — have tortured — have destroyed me.

In this story, the narrator begins his confession in retrospect, at a time when he was considered to be a perfectly normal person, known for his docility and his humane considerations of animals and people. His parents indulged his fondness for animals, and he was allowed to have many different kinds of pets.

Furthermore, he was very fortunate to marry a woman who was also fond of animals. Among the many animals that they possessed was a black cat which they named Pluto.

Since his wife often made allusions to the popular notion that all black cats are witches in disguise, the name Pluto which is the name of one of the gods of the underworld in charge of witches becomes significant in terms of the entire story.

The other popular notion relevant to this story is the belief that a cat has nine lives; this superstition becomes a part of the story when the second black cat is believed to be a reincarnation of the dead Pluto with only one slight but horrible modification — the imprint of the gallows on its breast.

Interestingly, Pluto was the narrator's favorite animal and for several years, there was a very special relationship between the animal and the narrator. Then suddenly due partly to alcoholthe narrator underwent a significant change.

Here, the narrator undergoes such a change. The effect of this change is indicated when he came home intoxicated, imagined that the beloved cat avoided him, then grasped the cat by its throat and with a pen knife, cut out one of its eyes.

This act of perversity is the beginning of several such acts which will characterize the "totality of effect" that Poe wanted to achieve in this story. The next morning, he writes, he was horrified by what he had done, and in time the cat recovered but now it deliberately avoided the narrator.

As the cat continued to avoid the narrator, the spirit of perverseness overcame him again — this time, with an unfathomable longing of the soul to "offer violence. He is ashamed of his perversity because he knows that the cat had loved him and had given him no reason to hang it. What he did was an act of pure perversity.

That night, after the cruel deed was executed, his house burned to the ground. Being a rational and analytical person, the narrator refuses to see a connection between his perverse atrocity of killing the cat and the disaster that consumed his house.

Again, we have an example of the mad mind offering up a rational rejection of anything so superstitious that the burning of the house might be retribution for his killing the cat. However, on the following day, he visited the ruins of the house and saw a crowd of people gathered about.

One wall, which had just been replastered and was still wet, was still standing. It was the wall just above where his bed had previously stood and engraved into the plaster was a perfect image of the figure of a gigantic cat, and there was a rope about the animal's neck.

Once again, the narrator's mad mind attempts to offer a rational explanation for this phenomena. He believes that someone found the cat's dead body, flung it into the burning house to awaken the narrator, and the burning of the house, the falling of the walls, and the ammonia from the carcass cats are filled with ammonia; Poe wrote essays on cats, their instincts, their logic, and their habits — all these factors contributed to the creation of the graven image.

But the narrator does not account for the fact that the image is that of a gigantic cat; thus we must assume that the image took on gigantic proportions only within the mind of the narrator.

For months, the narrator could not forget about the black cat, and one night when he was drinking heavily, he saw another black cat that looked exactly like Pluto — except for a splash of white on its breast.

Upon inquiry, he found out that no one knew anything about the cat, which he then proceeded to take home with him. The cat became a great favorite of his and his wife. The narrator's perversity, however, caused him to soon change, and the cat's fondness for them began to disgust him. It was at this time that he began to loathe the cat.

What increased his loathing of the new cat was that it had, like Pluto, one of its eyes missing. In the mind of the narrator, this cat was obviously a reincarnation of Pluto.

He even notes to himself that the one trait that had once distinguished him — a humanity of feeling — had now almost totally disappeared. This is an example, as noted in the introduction, of how the mad man can stand at a distance and watch the process of his own change and madness.

After a time, the narrator develops an absolute dread of the cat. When he discovers that the white splash on its breast, which at first was rather indefinite, had "assumed a rigorous distinctness of outline" and was clearly and obviously a hideous, ghastly, and loathsome image of the gallows, he cries out, "Oh, mournful and terrible engine of Horror and of Crime — of Agony and of Death!The Black Cat Essay - A Glimpse Into the World of 'The Black Cat'; Those who have read any of Edgar Allan Poe's short stories know that most of them are full of suspense and mystery and that they efflict a feeling of horror and shock upon the reader.

Edgar Allan Poe's "The Black Cat" "The Black Cat," which first appeared in the United States Saturday Post (The Saturday Evening Post) on August 19, , serves as a reminder for all of us. The capacity for violence and horror lies within each of us, no matter .

Feb 05,  · Symbolism in Edgar Allan Poe’s "The Black Cat" In Edgar Allan Poe’s "The Black Cat," symbolism is used to show the narrator’s capacity for violence, madness, and guilt. "The Black Cat," written by Edgar Allan Poe serves as a reminder for all . More than any of Poe's stories, "The Black Cat" illustrates best the capacity of the human mind to observe its own deterioration and the ability of the mind to comment upon its own destruction without being able to objectively halt that deterioration. Symbolism in Edgar Allan Poe’s "The Black Cat" In Edgar Allan Poe’s "The Black Cat," symbolism is used to show the narrator’s capacity for violence, madness, and guilt. "The Black Cat," written by Edgar Allan Poe serves as a reminder for all of us.

The Damning of the Haunted in Poe's "The Black Cat" A Critical Analysis Edgar Allan Poe had an insatiable passion for mystery, suspense, murder, horror, and the gothic in general, which is very evident in the majority of his writings/5(11).

More than any of Poe's stories, "The Black Cat" illustrates best the capacity of the human mind to observe its own deterioration and the ability of the mind to comment upon its own destruction without being able to objectively halt that deterioration.

The Black Cat Essay Examples. 93 total results.

An analysis of the capacity of every person in the world to be violent in the black cat by edgar all

An Analysis of the Capacity of Every Person in the World to be Violent in "The Black Cat" by Edgar Allan Poe.

4, words. 9 pages. Literary Analysis of the Story the Black Cat by . A Psychoanalytic Analysis on The Black Cat By Edgar Allan Poe First of all, let us go into the world of “The Black Cat” and delve into the inner workings of the dark side of the human mind. 'The Black Cat' is a story that leaves the reader perplexed to some extent.

"The Black Cat"